Seqwater works to flood-proof Qld’s water supply

Posted 28 November 2017

Pump Station
In a bid to flood-proof south-east Queensland’s water supply, Seqwater is embarking on a relocation project for the East Bank pump station as part of a long-term plan to mediate the negative effects of flooding in the region.

Expected to take five years, the project includes the construction of a new substation on higher ground near the existing East Bank pump station. Key electrical and communication infrastructure will also be moved to higher ground in order to flood-proof the site.

The plans follow results published in the Brisbane River Catchment Flood Study, which investigated regional-scale flooding on the Brisbane River floodplain caused by substantial rainfall across the Brisbane River catchment.

The study confirmed the risks of flood inundation to the pump station. 

“Data from the 1974, 2011 and 2013 floods provided critical information for the study, as well as data recorded by Seqwater in managing the Somerset and Wivenhoe Dams,” the study stated.  

“No two flood events are the same. They can involve minor localised flooding due to high rainfall over a short period in an isolated area or major flood events across the entire floodplain due to extreme weather over an extended period.”

In addition, the study proposed future steps for a Strategic Floodplain Management Plan, which focused on how to prepare for and manage a range of possible flood events with greater efficiency and coordination across the Brisbane River floodplain.

While the utility is still investigating options for the new substation site, it is working closely with Energy Queensland and Brisbane City Council to locate the best option.

Consultation has been undertaken with key stakeholders and feedback is also being sought from members of the local community, which is expected to be finalised early 2018. 

Related articles:
Queensland wastewater treatment plants prepare for future flood events
Queensland builds resilience to extreme weather events with largest-ever flood study